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Vanguardias rusas: nueva instalación


15.02.11-20.03.11

Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza
Paseo del Prado 8
28014 Madrid
Spanien
mtb@museothyssen.org
homepage


Vanguardias rusas: nueva instalación

Künstler: Mikhail Larionov, Natalija Gontscharowa, Wladimir Burliuk, David Burliuk, Marc Chagall, Wassily Kandinsky, Alexej von Jawlensky, Vladimir Baranov, Robert Delaunay, Sonia Delaunay, Tatiana Glebova, Alexandra Exter, Olga Rozanova, Nadeshda Udaltsova, David Kakabadze, Kasimir Malewitsch, Wladimir Tatlin, Ljubow Popowa, Ivan Kliun, Ilja Tschaschnik, Nicolai Suetin, El Lissitzky, Warwara Stepanowa, Alexander Rodtschenko, Alexander Vesnin


Pressetext:

In the early years of the 20thcentury a unique and unprecedented cultural renaissance took place within the heart of Imperial Russia (soon to become the Soviet Union). The Russian art world sprang to life with programmatic exhibitions, passionate manifestoes and theoretical declarations, accompanied by the rise of numerous different avant-garde movements that combined a variety of foreign influences with authentic creations of the nascent, revolutionary Russia. The Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza houses the most important collection of Soviet avant-garde art in Spain, both in its Permanent Collection and in the Carmen Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection. Normally on show in various different galleries in the Museum, these workshave been temporarily brought together in rooms 42 and 43 on the ground floor of the Palacio de Villahermosa. This new display aims to offer visitors a condensed overview of the different Russian avant-garde movements, on occasions known collectively as the Great Experiment. The display, with the works hung deliberately close together and on several levels, aims to reproduce the provocative way that the artists involved chose to hang their works in their exhibitions. In addition, it attempts to recreate the innovative spirit of the Russian avant-gardes in their ongoing quest for the transformation of life through art.